A STANDARD ENGLISH - SWAHILI DICTIONARY

A STANDARD ENGLISH - SWAHILI DICTIONARY

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A STANDARD ENGLISH - SWAHILI DICTIONARY : This Dictionary is founded on Madan's Original Swahili Dictionary. It contains English equivalent words and also short explanations in Swahili, phrases and idioms occurring in modern English. Many definitions and examples contained in this work are identical with those in Madan's dictionaries.

Swahili, also known as Kiswahili (translation: language of the Swahili people), is a Bantu language and the first language of the Swahili people. It is a lingua franca of the African Great Lakes region and other parts of eastern and south-eastern Africa, including Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Mozambique, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).[7] Comorian, spoken in the Comoros Islands is sometimes considered to be a dialect of Swahili, though other authorities consider it a distinct language.[8]

The exact number of Swahili speakers, be it native or second-language speakers, is unknown and a matter of debate. Various estimates have been put forward and they vary widely, from 50 million to over 100 million.[2] Swahili serves as a national language of four nations: Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, and the DRC. Shikomor, the official language in Comoros and also spoken in Mayotte (Shimaore), is related to Swahili.[9] Swahili is also one of the working languages of the African Union and officially recognised as a lingua franca of the East African Community.[10]

A significant fraction of Swahili vocabulary derives from Arabic[11] through contact with Persian-speaking Muslim inhabitants. For example, the Swahili word for "book" is kitabu, traceable back to the Arabic word ???? kitabu (from the root k.t.b. "write"). However, the Swahili plural form of this word ("books") is vitabu, following Bantu grammar in which ki- is reanalysed as a nominal class prefix, whose plural is vi-.[12]


Swahili is a Bantu language of the Sabaki branch.[13] In Guthrie's geographic classification, Swahili is in Bantu zone G, whereas the other Sabaki languages are in zone E70, commonly under the name Nyika. Local folk-theories of the language have often considered Swahili to be a mixed language because of its many loan words from Arabic, and the fact that Swahili people have historically been Muslims. However, historical linguists do not consider the Arabic influence on Swahili to be significant enough to classify it as a mixed language, since Arabic influence is limited to lexical items, most of which have only been borrowed after 1500, while the grammatical and syntactic structure of the language is typically Bantu.[14][15]

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